Board Considerations: The Importance of a COVID-19 Task Force

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By Sharon Danosky

As discussions begin to emerge on reopening our state, board members in partnership with executive directors should be advancing their own discussions about how to effectively and safely re-open their own organizations. The strength of a board is the different perspectives, and experience they bring to the discussion, just by asking some critical questions:


1) How can we keep our staff healthy as we re-open?
2) How can we meet the needs of our constituents, especially those most vulnerable populations?
3) How can we mitigate potential risks?
4) What are potential legal considerations or ramifications?
5) What are the financial implications and do we have the necessary resources?
6) What does our financial picture look like over the comings weeks and months?
7) Can we sustain whatever plan we decide on?
8) How can we keep raising funds?
9) How do we roll out our communications?
10) Is our Business Continuity Plan on point – or how do we adjust it?


One way of addressing these questions and the many more questions that evolve is to set up a Task Force charged with addressing issues brought about by COVID 19 and the re-opening of your services. For those with a small board, your entire board can serve as your COVID-19 Task Force. There is minimal business as usual reporting going on – and most of your discussions are probably around COVID-19. For those with larger boards, a Task Force allows you to bring in expertise you might not have on your board – in HR, legal, financial, supply chain, communications, etc. You can also bring in that expertise if you are a smaller board.

All planning should be done in conjunction with your Executive Director – she/he or they are an important – even critical – part of this planning process. However, the Executive Director should not be charged with researching and making all these decisions alone or in a vacuum. A strong Board/Executive Director partnership will yield the best outcomes – for the organization and for the community.

 

Crisis Communications: Beyond the First Few Weeks

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By Sharon Danosky

We are now entering the sixth week of “Sheltering at Home.” Nothing seems normal, yet many have found a new routine and rhythm. And so it should be with your communications at this stage.

As you move through this extended crisis, maintaining communications with your constituents is vitally important. One and done just doesn’t work. Instead, this is the time to engage with your constituents – and particularly your donors.

During a crisis there are actually four phases to the communication process. Each requires different messaging which is based on the changing perspective and circumstances of your constituents – and your organization. If done well, each phase can strengthen the connection with your constituents and lead you to a having a stronger long-term relationship. [Read more…]

An Alternative to the “Virtual Event”

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By Sharon Danosky

I have been hearing and seeing questions about holding a “Virtual Event.”

First, I should probably state that I come from a place that believes people want to help when help is needed and that they do not need an event – virtual or otherwise – to give, and given generously.  All you need to do is ask authentically and let them know why you need their help.
In many ways events – including “virtual events” can detract from that.  It puts the focus on your event – and not your organization and its good deeds. [Read more…]

Social Media in a COVID-19 World

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By David Deschenes

Nonprofit organizations are active users of social media, so most are familiar with the go-to platforms such as Facebook, Instagram, Constant Contact, YouTube, etc. But as organizations deal with COVID-19, they will need to expand the way they use these platforms. It is important – now more than ever – to make sure you’re delivering critical information to the right people. Here are some ways to use social media as you navigate COVID-19. [Read more…]

Talk to your Donors

Covid-19 Info Banner for CC - 3-19-20 - D&A

By Sharon Danosky

What really good fundraisers know – is how to stay close to their donors.  Organizations that raise considerable money put their time and resources toward that purpose.

While people are sheltering at home and hungry for human interaction, it is an opportunity for you to allocate your time to building relationships with those who care about your organization.

We often refer to our donors as members of “our family.”  This is the time that families are connecting; making sure everyone is okay.  Taking time to re-connect.

Use this time to get closer to your donors.  Call them on the phone and have a conversation.  Call a few donors every single day.  First thing in the morning; right after lunch; mid-afternoon; last thing in the day.

When you call them – first ask how they are doing. Then share how you are doing.  Let them know what is happening with people who work at your organization and how your organization is doing.   How is everyone faring?  What is happening with your programs?  What are your organization’s immediate plans?  Be reassuring.  Be authentic.  Show empathy.  And ask them if they would mind if you checked in again in a few weeks.

If they aren’t there leave a message.  A nice one; that is kind and caring.  Not business like – but as you would a friend or a member of your family.

You will develop relationships with your donors in a way that you never have before, while significantly increasing future philanthropic support for your organization.