Board Considerations: The Importance of a COVID-19 Task Force

task force
By Sharon Danosky

As discussions begin to emerge on reopening our state, board members in partnership with executive directors should be advancing their own discussions about how to effectively and safely re-open their own organizations. The strength of a board is the different perspectives, and experience they bring to the discussion, just by asking some critical questions:


1) How can we keep our staff healthy as we re-open?
2) How can we meet the needs of our constituents, especially those most vulnerable populations?
3) How can we mitigate potential risks?
4) What are potential legal considerations or ramifications?
5) What are the financial implications and do we have the necessary resources?
6) What does our financial picture look like over the comings weeks and months?
7) Can we sustain whatever plan we decide on?
8) How can we keep raising funds?
9) How do we roll out our communications?
10) Is our Business Continuity Plan on point – or how do we adjust it?


One way of addressing these questions and the many more questions that evolve is to set up a Task Force charged with addressing issues brought about by COVID 19 and the re-opening of your services. For those with a small board, your entire board can serve as your COVID-19 Task Force. There is minimal business as usual reporting going on – and most of your discussions are probably around COVID-19. For those with larger boards, a Task Force allows you to bring in expertise you might not have on your board – in HR, legal, financial, supply chain, communications, etc. You can also bring in that expertise if you are a smaller board.

All planning should be done in conjunction with your Executive Director – she/he or they are an important – even critical – part of this planning process. However, the Executive Director should not be charged with researching and making all these decisions alone or in a vacuum. A strong Board/Executive Director partnership will yield the best outcomes – for the organization and for the community.

 

Communications Assessments: Looking Within to Communicate Out

Communicating to a Group

By David Deschenes

“When you consider our limited staff and marketing budget, we put out a LOT of information – bi-annual fundraising letters, quarterly newsletters, flyers, and an annual report. We also send more than 30 e-blasts a year and have a robust presence on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. It’s all important, timely and informative communications. But we’re struggling to keep up with it. We rely on other departments to get us at least the starting content for our collateral, and we often can’t get it when we need it. We feel like we’re always scrambling or trying to ‘wing it’ with content that’s owned by others.”

This was one of the primary concerns we heard at our first meeting with a new client who had hired us to conduct a communications assessment – a top-to-bottom audit of all current marketing and communications efforts in practice by the organization. [Read more…]